A World Without Branding – Why It Would Never Work

21st January 2019

Rory Sutherland, Vice Chairman of Ogilvy UK, will examine the vital role brands play in our society. He argues that for too long we have completely underestimated brands. Part of our Can Marketing Save Lives? speaker series.

Review

“The value of a brand lies in all the questions you no longer need to ask. There’s less brain activity when buying a known brand.”

“When we recognize it, we no longer need to think about it. We trust it. We choose a brand over another, there’s a need for competition because we make decisions based on which one presents less risk. If there’s no clear brand for a specific product, it’s impossible to make the decision.”

A few insights from Rory Sutherland, Vice Chairman of Ogilvy UK, who was at the Museum of Brands this Monday 21th January for his talk on the importance of brands, A World Without Branding – and Why It Would Never Work. With a full house of over 100 attendees including marketers from Thinkbox, Bacardi and UKTV, this was a captivating and lively event.

Brands like Coca-Cola, Redbull, Walkman, Jameson, Royal Mail and Tripadvisor were discussed during the talk and the very engaging Q&A. All things considered products are only as good as their brands. “Bad marketing can kill great products.”, Rory concluded.

Coming up in February two more talks: Neuroscience – Why Do People Buy? with Sandra Murphy, Director of Neuroscience at Nielsen, and Partnerships in Marketing with Jane Asscher, founder of 23red.

The Museum’s professional development programme is kindly supported by The Marketors’ Trust @marketors

Keep in touch @museumofbrands

About Rory Sutherland

Rory Sutherland is the Vice Chairman of Ogilvy, where he has worked since 1988. This attractively vague job title has allowed him to form a behavioural science practice within the agency whose job is to uncover the hidden business and social possibilities which emerge when you apply creative minds to the latest thinking in psychology and behavioural science.

Supported by The Marketors’ Trust

CLOSE
CLOSE